Skip to content Skip to footer

Complete Guide: Speeding Fines Western Australia

In 2022, drivers in Western Australia racked up 843,593 speeding fines, about two-thirds of these fines were for offences of driving between 1-10km/hr over the speed limit. Between 2016 and 2020, 1662 people were killed or seriously injured in speed-related crashes in WA. In 2022, 45% of fatal crashes occurred in 110 km/h speed zones.(1)

For every 5km/h increase in travelling speed within a 60km/h zone, the risk of being injured in a crash doubles. At 65km/h the chance of having a crash resulting in injury doubles, it’s four times more likely at 70km/h and the risk increases by 32 times at 80km/h.  

What is a speeding offence in WA? 

Driving at any speed above the posted speed limit is considered an excessive speeding offence in Western Australia. The penalties and fines will differ depending on how fast the driver is going at the time of the offence.  

Driving at speeds exceeding 155km/hr on any length of road, or more than 45km/hr above the speed limit is considered reckless speeding under section 60A of the Road Traffic Act 1974.(2)  Reckless speeding offences come with more severe penalties such as fines of 120 penalty units ($6000) or imprisonment for nine months, as well as license disqualification for six months for first time offenders. 

Demerit points and fines by speeding offence in WA 

Depending on the type of vehicle you are driving, and the speed at which you are exceeding the speed limit, fines and demerit amounts will differ. Speeding fines use penalty units, the value of a penalty unit is $50.00. 

For infringements issued in a double demerit period (such as public holidays), demerit points will be doubled but the fine amounts will stay the same. 

These are the current penalties for speeding infringements in Western Australia as of 1st of January 2024:(3) 

Light Vehicle 

Not more than 9 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 0 
  • Speeding fine: 2 penalty units = $100 

More than 9 but not more than 19 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 2 
  • Speeding fine: 4 penalty units = $200 

More than 19 but not more than 29 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 3 
  • Speeding fine: 8 penalty units = $400 

More than 29 but not more than 40 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 6 
  • Speeding fine: 16 penalty units = $800 

More than 40 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 7 
  • Speeding fine: 24 penalty units = $1,200 

Heavy Vehicle (4) 

Not more than 9 km/h   

  • Demerit points: 0 
  • Speeding fine: $200 

More than 9km/h but not more than 19 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 2 
  • Speeding fine: $300 

More than 19 km/h but not more than 29 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 3 
  • Speeding fine: $500 

More than 29 km/h but not more than 40 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 6 
  • Speeding fine: $1,200 

More than 29 km/h but not more than 40 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 6 
  • Speeding fine: $1,200 

More than 40 km/h 

  • Demerit points: 7 
  • Speeding fine: $1,500 

Speeding detection and evasion in WA 

Some drivers may use devices such as radar detectors, radar jammers or other devices used for evading speed cameras, as a means of speed detection evasion. Even if these devices are not turned on, if found within the vehicle (including trailers and caravans), heavy penalties will apply. 

Light Vehicle 

Driving with a radar detector fitted to, within or on the vehicle – operational or not 

  • Demerit points: 7 
  • Speeding fine: $1,200 

Driving with any device that would adversely affect speed measuring equipment 

  • Demerit points: 7 
  • Speeding fine: $1,200 

Driving in a manner that would adversely affect speed measuring equipment 

  • Demerit points: 7 
  • Speeding fine: $1,200 

Heavy Vehicle 

Driving with a radar detector fitted to, within or on the vehicle – operational or not 

  • Demerit points: 7 
  • Speeding fine: $1,500 

Driving with any device that would adversely affect speed measuring equipment 

  • Demerit points: 7 
  • Speeding fine: $1,500 

Driving in a manner that would adversely affect speed measuring equipment 

  • Demerit points: 7 
  • Speeding fine: $1,500 

The Average Speed Safety Camera Zone 

The Average Speed Safety Camera Zone operates on Forrest Highway (between Mandurah & Bunbury) in both directions. (5)

Once a driver enters the zone, a camera will record an image of the vehicle, then another image will be taken when the vehicle exits the zone. These images are used to measure the vehicles: 

  • Entry speed – if the vehicle exceeds the posted speed limit, a speeding infringement may be issued 
  • Exit speed – if the vehicle exceeds the posted speed limit at this point, a speeding infringement may be issued 
  • Average speed between the two cameras – if the vehicle’s average speed exceeds the posted speed limit, a speeding infringement may be issued. 

So, if you are caught speeding at any point in the zone you will receive at least one infringement. But depending on the nature of the speeding offence, the WA Police can decide how they want to enforce this. 

How to pay a speeding fine in WA  

The infringement notice will include a due date for when payment is required by. If full payment is not received by this date, a final demand notice will be issued, you will have 28 days to pay from the due date on the notice. If full payment of the final demand notice is not received by the due date, the notice will be registered with the Fines Enforcement Registry, which carries further costs and possible suspension of your vehicle and/or drivers licence.(6)

You will need to use your Customer Reference Number (CRN) if you’re paying online, over the phone, or in person. This should be printed on the infringement notice. 

1. Pay Online 

You can pay your fine online here(7) or using your card details here.(8)

2. Pay via BPAY 

BPAY payments are made via your finical instructions either online or using your phone. It may take several days for a BPAY payment to be processed, so check with your bank to ensure you’re paying your fine on time.  

You’ll require the payment reference number and the biller code on your fine to pay via BPAY.  

BPAY may not be available for all infringements, so make sure to double check your infringement notice to see if this is available to you. 

3. Pay via Phone 

You can pay your fines over the phone by calling 1300 276 468, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and entering your credit card details (MasterCard or Visa) along with your CRN. Payments made after 5.00 pm AEST will be processed the following working day. 

4. In person 

Pay in person at any Magistrates Court in Western Australia. 

5. Pay via Direct Debit 

Arrange direct debit payments from your bank account by completing a Direct Debit Request Form (9) (available from your nearest court or contact Fines Enforcement Registry to get a mailed copy) and posting to:  

Fines Enforcement Registry,  

Department of Justice,  

GPO Box X2293,  

PERTH WA 6847.  

Please note this does not automatically lift a fine suspension. 

6. Pay via Post. 

Post a cheque or money order to:  

Fines Enforcement Registry, Department of Justice,  

GPO Box X2293,  

PERTH WA 6847. 

Please note, you cannot pay your fine with cash via post. 

7. Time to Pay Arrangement

Apply for a Time to Pay Arrangement through the eCourts Portal at My Fines/Infringements(10), complete and return a Time to Pay Application Form(11) (also available at your nearest Magistrates Court), by post, by email to [email protected] or by phoning the Fines Enforcement Registry. 

Where does the money from a speeding fine in WA go? 

100 percent of the revenue resulting from photographic speed and red-light camera fines, goes to the Road Trauma Trust Account (RTTA). These funds are managed by the Road Safety Commission and are used to implement priority road safety projects that address road safety initiatives consistent with the Road Safety Strategy for Western Australia 2020-2030.(12) 

This Road Safety Strategy aims for a reduction in road deaths and serious injuries of 50 – 70% by 2030. (13)

Licence suspension and disqualification for speeding in WA 

The court can disqualify you from driving as a penalty for a driving related offence, but the police can also immediately disqualify your licence if you are charged with certain drink/drug driving offences. (14)

Disqualification from driving means you cannot drive for a certain period of time, or apply for a licence. Once the disqualification ends, you are normally able to drive again using your current licence. In certain circumstances, your licence may also be cancelled, and you will have to re-sit your test to get your licence back when the disqualification has ended. 

There are two types of licence suspension; a Licence Suspension Order or ‘fine suspension’ and demerit point suspension.  

A Licence Suspension Order can be issued if you have unpaid fines of infringements, you can drive again when you are no longer subject to a Licence Suspension Order or any other order that affects your licence by removing your authority to drive. Be sure to check the status of your licence before you drive.(15)

A demerit point suspension occurs if you have received a certain amount of demerit points within a three-year period, depending on how many points this suspension can last from at least 3 months and up to 5 months.  

Drivers with a learners permit or first year P-Plate drivers can only receive 4 or more demerit points, second year P-Plate drivers can only receive 8 or more demerit points, and those with an ordinary licence can only receive 12 or more points in a three-year period before they lose their licence.  

At the end of your demerit point suspension, your demerit point tally will go back to zero. 

You cannot apply for an extraordinary driving licence under a demerit point suspension.(16)

What is an extraordinary driving licence? 

A person who has been disqualified from driving, may be allowed to drive in certain circumstances using an extraordinary drivers licence. This is granted by whichever court imposed the licence disqualification and is subject to strict conditions. 

A person can apply for an extraordinary driver’s licence if they have a licence disqualification or suspension. The court may grant this licence if the person shows that if they cannot drive: 

  • They or a family member will be unable to get urgent medical treatment for an existing disability, disease, or illness 
  • Or, the main source of income will be lost, causing undue financial burden on the person or their family, 
  • Or, they or someone in their family will have no practicable means of transport to and from work. 

Book a driver education course with Road Sense Australia 

Whether you just got booked for a speeding offence or just want to learn more, consider if booking our Traffic Offender Intervention Program (TOIP) could help you. TOIP is an accredited community-based program designed to help participants understand road safety and ultimately become safer drivers. Our TOIP delivers the skills and necessary information to help shape positive perspectives, helping our participants develop into more responsible, and safer road users.    

–  

To find out more about our other programs, click HERE.   

Or get involved in the conversation by following us on:   

Facebook   

Twitter   

LinkedIn   

YouTube   

Instagram 

 

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16)